Home / Tech / Russia and North Korea have a tiny shared border, which Kim Jong Un just crossed — and you can take a look around on Google Maps

Russia and North Korea have a tiny shared border, which Kim Jong Un just crossed — and you can take a look around on Google Maps

north korea russia border tower

  • North Korea is entirely shrouded on Google Maps — but some parts just outside its border aren’t.
  • The country has a short border with Russia, which Kim Jong Un crossed in April 2019 to meet Vladimir Putin.
  • Parts of Linenaya Ulitsa, a Russian road bordering North Korea, is available on Google Street View.
  • Take a peek into North Korea through these photos taken along the road.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

North Korea is arguably the most secretive nation in the world.

It shares long borders with China to its north, and also with South Korea. But the third, and by far the shortest, frontier is an 11-mile stretch of land it shares with Russia.

Unlike the Chinese border, the Russian one has allowed access to Google’s camera cars, which can come pretty close to the Korea Russia Friendship Bridge (“Druzhny Bridge” in Russia), a rail link between the two nations.

Kim Jong Un, North Korea’s leader, likely crossed this bridge during his train journey to eastern Russia this week, where he will meet President Vladimir Putin for the first time.

Peek into North Korea from Linenaya Ulitsa, a road along its border with Russia, through these photos:

SEE ALSO: Take a tour of the closest Chinese city to North Korea — the nearest thing to the outside world most North Koreans will ever see

North Korea is notoriously secretive and hidden from Google Maps’ Street View function — all the areas not in blue can’t be accessed on the service.

The regions of Primorsky, Russia, and Josan-ri, North Korea, are divided by the Tumen River, a 320-mile long river along North Korea’s border with China and Russia.

There’s Google Maps imagery up to the tip of Linenaya Ulitsa, a road that stops just before the river.

Tourists in Yanbian, a Chinese prefecture that borders both North Korea and Russia, can peer into North Korea at a designated observation point, where you can see the Druzhny Bridge.

See the rest of the story at Business Insider