PM Modi asks ministers to connect with people in two LS constituencies a month

NEW DELHI: In a bid to exchange notes directly with the people, Prime Minister Narendra Modi and his entire Council of Ministers will travel to Lok Sabha constituencies outside their state next year.

Modi
The decision was taken during the recently concluded winter session of Parliament amidst an intense government-Congress face off, which disrupted Rajya Sabha. The government had failed to get the Congress on board for passage of the Goods and Services Tax (GST) bill, which the ruling side had prioritised.
Each member of the Council of Ministers will cover at least two constituencies in a month, spending 30 hours in each, government sources said. During their stay, they are expected to hold public meetings, press conferences and meetings with intellecutals in which they will communicate the government’s policy matrix, schemes and direction. The ministers are also expected to take feedback from the people.

Modi wants the next union budget to be based on inputs from the people to ensure a “people friendly” budget, the sources said.
Union ministers Prakash Javadekar and Narendra Singh Tomar are preparing the list of places which the ministers will be visiting.
The ministers have already sent a choice list of ten constituencies to visit. However, it is yet to be known which places the Prime Minister will tour as part of the programme. With a total of around 70 ministers–26 cabinet (excluding the Prime Minister), 13 ministers of state with independent charge and 31 ministers of state– all Lok Sabha constituencies across the country will be covered over four months.
Modi had conveyed this plan to his council of ministers at a meeting on December 17. He had also told them that the government should keep the last man in the queue in mind in its approach and statements.
An aggressive opposition, in the aftermath of the Bihar debacle, has been accusing the government of witch-hunting in the wake of the National Herald case. The standoff overshadowed the Winter Session of Parliament. The ministers will now take the government’s side of the story to clear the perception about the government, sources said.

Tell their story
An aggressive opposition, in the aftermath of the Bihar debacle, has been accusing the government of witch-hunting in the wake of the National Herald case. The standoff overshadowed the Winter Session of Parliament. The ministers will now take the government’s side of the story to clear the perception about the government, sources said.

With Agencies