India’s plan to cut emissions indicates ‘seriousness’: UN chief Ban Ki-moon

New York City(Reuters): India’s plan to slash greenhouse gas emissions indicates its “seriousness” in confronting climate change challenges and will help the world “bend” temperature projections for the rest of the century, UN chief Ban Ki-moon has said ahead of the crucial Paris summit.

Ban Ki-moon

The UN Secretary General also took note of India’s concerns over the lack of climate ambition on display by developed countries on both fronts of mitigation and support, saying that there is “no question” that developed countries need to take the lead on climate action.

“I welcome India’s submission of its Intended Nationally Determined Contribution (INDC). I believe it indicates the seriousness with which India is confronting the challenges of climate change, and it will help the world ‘bend’ the temperature projections for the rest of this century,” Ban told PTI.

In its INDCs, India has offered to slash its emissions per-unit of gross domestic product figures to 35 per cent by 2030.

The United Nations Climate Change Conference, widely known as Conference of Parties (CoP 21), will take place from November 30 to December 11 in Paris and will aim to achieve a legally binding and universal agreement on climate, with the aim of keeping global warming below 2 C.

More than 120 leaders, including Prime Minister Narendra Modi, will participate in the 21st Meeting of the States Parties to the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change.

India has expressed deep concern over the lack of climate ambition on display by developed countries on both fronts of mitigation and support. Ban said while there is no question that developed countries need to take the lead on climate action, nations however have to move forward.

“Global emissions are continuing to rise. We have to look at the issue differently. We have to recognise that all countries have to do their part, to the extent they have the resources and capacity to take action,” Ban said.

He stressed that countries understand that all nations need to be involved in the solutions, and all need to see that the benefits of low-carbon, climate-resilient growth are realised by all.

“Developed countries need to lead but all countries need to contribute,” he said.

India has stressed that developed countries cannot undermine the core principles of equity and common but differentiated responsibilities in arriving at a climate deal.

Ban emphasised that the Paris conference has to result in an agreement that is “fair”. He said it needs to demonstrate solidarity with the poor and most vulnerable countries.

“It has to recognise and respond to the circumstances and needs of the most vulnerable, who have not contributed to the problem of climate change yet have the most to lose due to its impacts,” he said.