NSA talks: India to give proof of ISI’s plans to open second front in East

During NSA-level talks, India is preparing to confront Pakistan on ISI’s designs to destabilise India’s eastern border also and give evidence it has gathered on ISI’s role in propping up Jamat-ul-Mujahideen-Bangladesh (JMB) and activate its machinery in Bangladesh and Indian states of West Bengal and Assam.


Sources said though the talks will centre mainly around Pak-sponsored terrorism carried out through India’s western border and the terrorist training camps and launching pads being operated from Pakistan-occupied-Kashmir (PoK) to send in fidayeens, India also wants to expose ISI’s bigger game plan that aims to destabilise India’s eastern states that includes West Bengal, Assam and the northeastern states.

Burdwan blast case, that led to the exposure of JMB’s extensive network in both Bangladesh and Indian states of Assam and West Bengal, has brought out ISI’s covert role in aiding the terror outfit that aims to establish an Islamic state based on Shariat including Bangladesh and several districts of West Bengal and Assam.

The ISI, sources said, has gone in a hyperbole mode to encourage fundamentalist and terror elements in Bangladesh since Sheikh Hasina’s liberal regime started building bonds with India.

There are also intelligence inputs that corroborate ISI’s dabbling in Myanmar to aid Indian insurgent groups and it is believed to have played an important role, along with China, in the creation of United Liberation Front of Western South East Asia (ULFWSEA), a conglomeration of four insurgent outfits – United Liberation Front of Asom (ULFA), NSCN (K), KLO and NDFB.

Three senior ISI officials were present in Myanmar trying to broker a deal when ULFWSEA cadres killed 18 Army jawans in Chandel district of Manipur, said sources. They, however, declined to give the details of evidence that NSA Ajit Doval will share with his counterpart Sartaj Aziz on ISI’s meddling in India’s eastern front.

Posted by on August 21, 2015. Filed under Editorial. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0. Both comments and pings are currently closed.