Maggi noodles controversy : After Delhi , Maggi banned in Uttarakhand

New Delhi: Latest updates say that No monosodium glutamate (MSG) added in Maggi, reiterates Maggi India.FSSAI has ordered country wide test on all variants of Maggi. In the wake of samples of Maggi instant noodles being found to contain an excess of lead, the Shiv Sena has called for the monitoring and supervision of ready-to-cook foods. According to reports, the party termed the reports ‘disturbing’ for consumers, especially parents, and has raised the question of why quality control was not done till now. The Shiv Sena further stated that several generations had suffered due to these lapses.

Uttarakhand has joined the list of states to ban the sale of Maggi with samples of the popular food product failing laboratory tests. “A decision to ban the sale of Maggi was taken late last night in public interest by the Food Security Department as 2 of a 300 odd samples of the food product failed laboratory tests,” Principal Secretary Health Om Prakash said.

The decision was prompted by the presence of monosodium glutamate (MSG) in the samples sent for laboratory tests to Rudrapur in Udhamsingh Nagar district, he said. “As the matter concerns public health we lost no time in imposing a ban on the popular food product in Uttarakhand. An order pronouncing the ban and seeking immediate withdrawal of the product from market places is being formally issued today,” he said.

However, no lead content was found in the samples tested, the official said, adding that out of the 300 samples sent to Rudrapur laboratory, test results of a majority of them are still awaited. After test results of all the samples collected from different places across the state arrive they will be sent to Kolkata for the final laboratory tests, the Principal Secretary Health said.

Big retailers like Big Bazar have already withdrawn Maggi packets from their outlets in the city, he said, adding small retailers may take some more time to do so

Posted by on June 4, 2015. Filed under Editorial. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0. Both comments and pings are currently closed.