World Cup 2015: Bowlers have to take blame for high scores, says McGrath

Australian fast bowling great Glenn McGrath has claimed that he would like the bowlers to stand up and claim a bit more responsibility for their conceding huge scores in the World Cup, instead of blaming it on the changes in modern cricket.

McGrath claims that they are all saying how tough it is for the bowlers with the rule changes, with the power plays, with only four fieldsmen outside the circle in the final 10, insisting that he would just like to see the bowlers actually stand up and take a bit more responsibility.

The former pace express said that apart from Lasith Malinga and Mitchell Starc he hasn’t seen many bowlers trying to bowl good yorkers and insisted that that comes back to them not putting the time in the nets, reported.

McGrath said that the yorker remained the key to limiting scoring at the death. He said that if one can deliver six perfect yorkers, they are still hard to play, adding that it cuts down the scoring options, insisting that maybe guys like AB de Villers and Steve Smith can still find ways, but claimed that it’s tougher.

McGrath said that apart from Malinga and Starc he doesn’t see any bowlers who really do it, adding that they come in and try one and they get it wrong because they haven’t really worked on it. So he said that the bowlers go back to bowling a short ball, a slower ball, just mixing it up and insisted that that’s fine but claimed that it opens up the whole field to score and when one has got fewer fieldsmen on the boundary it’s tougher to defend.

McGrath claimed that everyone is saying how much tougher it is for bowlers, which it is, but he believes that the bowlers really have to take responsibility and work on their skill level to be able to match the changes.

McGrath said that at the end of the day the only thing the bowler can do is deliver the ball where he wants, adding that if he can do that he’s still going to be effective.

Posted by on March 13, 2015. Filed under Sports World. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0. Both comments and pings are currently closed.