Barack Obama invites PM Modi, Nawaz Sharif to Washington next year

NEW DELHI: US President Barack Obama has invited Prime Minister Narendra Modi and his Pakistani counterpart Nawaz Sharif to attend the Nuclear Security Summit to be held in 2016.

Modi Sharif

“President Barack Obama has invited both prime ministers for the Nuclear Security Summit on March 31 and April 1, 2016. Though no formal announcements have been made, it is almost certain that both Mr. Modi and Mr. Sharif will be attending it,” reported The Hindu.

The report, referring to the White House statement, added that Obama sees “nuclear terrorism.. the most immediate and extreme threat to global security,” according to a White House statement on the summit.

The US capital will likely be the venue for the next meeting between the Prime Ministers Narendra Modi and Nawaz Sharif, after Modi sprang a surprise by making a sudden stopover in Lahore on his return to New Delhi from Kabul.

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The conference will become the first planned occasion in 2016 that will bring Modi and Sharif together.

Modi’s 150-minute surprise visit to Pakistan last week, was first by an Indian Prime Minister in nearly 12 years.

In Pakistan, he held talks with Sharif during which they decided to open ways for peace for the “larger good” of the people of the two countries.

The Foreign Secretaries of India and Pakistan will meet on January 15 in Islamabad.

Modi’s Pak visit: What happened behind the scenes to make it possible

Though there was no official announcement to this effect, reports said said that Foreign Secretary S Jaishankar will travel to Islamabad to hold talks with Sartaj Aziz, the Pakistani Prime Minister’s Adviser on Foreign Affairs.

The meeting will discuss modalities of bilateral comprehensive dialogue which was announced during the visit of External Affairs Minister Sushma Swaraj to Islamabad earlier this month.

(With agency inputs)

Posted by on December 29, 2015. Filed under Nation. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0. Both comments and pings are currently closed.